Visiting Writers Series

Each year, the Department of English brings visiting writers across genres for readings and master classes with students, hosted by our Writer-in-Residence, Wiley Cash. In recent years, the department has hosted several award-winning writers, including Ben Fountain, Camille Dungy, David Ebershoff, Chrystal Hana Kim, Frank X Walker, and many others.  Upcoming writers are listed below.

 

Claudia Rankine: Wednesday, February 24th, 7:00 pm

http://claudiarankine.com/

Acclaimed poet, essayist and Guggenheim Fellow, Claudia Rankine, will present a reading and talk via zoom on Wednesday, February 24th at 7:00 PM. One of the most prominent voices in literary and critical race studies, Rankine is the author of Just Us: An American Conversation (2020), and six collections of poetry, including Citizen: An American Lyric and Don’t Let Me Be Lonely; three plays including HELP, which premiered in March of 2020 at The Shed, NYC, The White Card, which premiered in February 2018 (ArtsEmerson/American Repertory Theater) and published by Graywolf Press in 2019, and Provenance of Beauty: A South Bronx Travelogue; as well as numerous video collaborations. She is also the co-editor of several anthologies including The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind (FENCE, 2015). In 2016, she co-founded The Racial Imaginary Institute (TRII).

This event is free and open to the public, but you must register at this link:
https://unca-edu.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_AhkKKQtwSP2mboIxRk7xXg

 

CJ Hauser: Tuesday March 16th, 7:00 pm

https://cjhauser.com

CJ Hauser teaches creative writing and literature at Colgate University. Her novel, Family of Origin, was published by Doubleday in 2019. She is also the author of the novel The From-Aways, and her fiction has appeared, or is forthcoming, in Tin HouseNarrative Magazine, The Paris Review, TriQuarterly, Esquire, Third Coast, and The Kenyon Review.

This event is free and open to the public, but you must register at this link:
https://unca-edu.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJUlcequpj0rEtFfd6aKn7wVsG6aMWGa2-s3

 

Kirstin Squint: Wednesday March 24, at 5:30 pm

https://english.ecu.edu/people/faculty/kirstin-squint/

Dr. Squint will give a public lecture via Zoom, in which she will set up the historical and theoretical framework from which we can consider Annette Saunooke Clapsaddle’s work, coming up the next week.

This event is free and open to the public, but you must register at this link:
https://unca-edu.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJclcu-qrT8oG9EBrhfo-Ba3ExWiCzfmQz8B

 

Annette Saunooke Clapsaddle: Wednesday March 31, at 5:30 pm

https://www.asaunookeclapsaddle.com/

Annette Saunooke Clapsaddle is the first Eastern Band Cherokee author to publish a novel, Even as We Breathe. She will give a public lecture via Zoom.

This event is free and open to the public, but you must register at this link:
https://unca-edu.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJYof-6upzstGNCh1cQ4Es_k0CX-2rW6aN8F

 

Artress Bethany White: Thursday April 15, at 7:00 pm

http://www.artressbethanywhite.com

Poet, essayist, and literary critic, Artress is the recipient of the 2018 Trio Award for her poetry collection, My Afmerica. Her prose and poetry have appeared in such journals as Harvard Review, Tupelo QuarterlyThe Hopkins ReviewPleiadesSolsticePoet LoreEcotone, and The Account. Her new collection of essays, Survivor’s Guilt: Essays on Race and American Identity, was recently published by New Rivers Press.

This event is free and open to the public, but you must register at this link:
https://unca-edu.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJUtdumgpj4tHtIIKQD4QVpYwfJ7Xn9LIv0o

 

Toril Moi: Tuesday April 20, at 7:00 pm

Can there be something like a “Wittgensteinian” literary criticism? If so, what could it possibly be, given that Wittgenstein sought to make us give up the craving for generality? Through an analysis of “The Avoidance of Love,” Stanley Cavell’s epochal 1969 essay on King Lear, Toril Moi shows that a reading inspired by Wittgenstein will attend to the phenomenology of the act of reading itself. She will discuss attitudes and states of mind such as vulnerability and arrogance and explore that intense sense of conviction that the critic may experience as she reaches her new insights. The Wittgenstein-inspired critic  stakes herself —  her own perceptions and judgments — in the act of reading. But this is nevertheless not a “purely subjective” reading. Rather, as Cavell writes, “The problem of the critic, as of the artist, is not to discount his subjectivity, but to include it; not to overcome it in agreement, but to master it in exemplary ways.”

This event is free and open to the public. The registration link will be available soon.

Past Events